9 Ways to Make Objective Decisions

Make-Objective-Decisions

It would be nice to make decisions based on logic instead of emotion. Making a rational decision is an essential skill, but it is one that is difficult to implement.

These options will help you to think more clearly about what need to happen, so you can take some of the emotion out of the equation.

1) Wear Someone’s Shoes.
When you place yourself into the perspective of someone else, it becomes easier to make an objective decision. The empathy that comes from “wearing the shoes” of someone else helps to reduce the influence of personal decisions.

2) Change the Question.
We often get tied to the emotions of a situation because of how we initially look at a situation. If you change the question, you get the chance to change the answer. Never settle for a single, default position.

3) Step Away.
If you find yourself in an emotional state, then step away from the situation for a little bit. Just 10 minutes away from a problematic situation can help you find a better course of action to take.

4) Avoid the Negatives.
Look for positive outcomes when making a decision. It is very easy to look at all the negative stuff that can come from a decision. Some might call this negativity “realism.” From a decision-making standpoint, it’s called “justification for failure.”

5) Know Yourself.
There are times when you’re not in the correct mood to make a decision. If you’re feeling angry or sad, then take a few minutes to process those emotions first. That will reduce the chances that the emotions will influence your next steps.

6) Look Long-Term.
We often approach decisions in a “what have you done for me lately” perspective. We look at the success or failure of recent days. Focus more on the bigger picture. That will help you to put more information into the correct context.

7) Ask Questions.
Don’t guess at things if you don’t have all the information needed to make a successful decision. Assumptions almost always lead to failure, even if they are educated assumptions. Ask questions instead. That will help you get to the root cause of the issues you’re facing.

Making a good decision isn’t luck. It is a skill that comes from your desire to be objective. Use these ideas to make better decisions starting today.