20 Magnificent Daniel Coyle Quotes

Daniel Coyle is the author of ‘The Talent Code.; As the former editor of Outside and two time National Magazine Award Finalist, Coyle has dedicated his life to sharing the secrets of unlocking your hidden potential. Here is a look at some of the best Daniel Coyle quotes from this career.

“Although talent feels and looks predestined, in fact we have a good deal of control over what skills we develop, and we have more potential than we might ever presume to guess.”

“Baby steps are the royal road to skill.”

“Deep practice feels a bit like exploring a dark and unfamiliar room. You start slowly, you bump into furniture, stop, think, and start again. Slowly, and a little painfully, you explore the space over and over, attending to errors, extending your reach into the room a bit farther each time, building a mental map until you can move through it quickly and intuitively.”

“Don’t look for the big, quick improvement. Seek the small improvement one day at a time.”

“Give a new skill a minimum of eight weeks.”

“I discovered when I went all out, when I put 100 percent of my energy into some intense, impossible task – when my heart was jack-hammering, when lactic acid was sizzling through my muscles – that’s when I felt good, normal, balanced.”


“If you were to visit a dozen talent hotbeds tomorrow, you would be struck by how much time the learners spend observing top performers.”

“In the interest of clarity, we’ll define talent in its strictest sense: the possession of repeatable skills that don’t depend on physical size”

“Practice doesn’t make perfect. Practice makes myelin, and myelin makes perfect.”

“Practice makes myelin, and myelin makes perfect.”

“Skill is a cellular insulation that wraps neural circuits and that grows in response to certain signals.”

“Skills are really just circuits in your brain.”

“Studies show that even a brief connection with a role model can vastly increase unconscious motivation.”

“The solution is to ignore the bad habit and put your energy toward building a new habit that will override the old one.”

“The staggering babies embody the deepest truth about deep practice: to get good, it’s helpful to be willing, or even enthusiastic, about being bad. Baby steps are the royal road to skill.”

“The sweet spot: that productive, uncomfortable terrain located just beyond our current abilities, where our reach exceeds our grasp. Deep practice is not simply about struggling; it’s about seeking a particular struggle, which involves a cycle of distinct actions.”

“There is no substitute for attentive repetition.”

“Things that appear to be obstacles turn out to be desirable in the long haul,” Bjork said. “One real encounter, even for a few seconds, is far more useful than several hundred observations.”

“This works because when you communicate a skill to someone, you come to understand it more deeply yourself.”

“To sum up: it’s time to rewrite the maxim that practice makes perfect. The truth is, practice makes myelin, and myelin makes perfect.”

Daniel Coyle reviews how to connect with one another and unlock their talent code. Finding a way to have a positive influence on your students and coworkers requires taking an internal look at your own range of capabilities. Check out this great speech given by Coyle himself.