Squeeze Page vs Landing Page

A squeeze page is not the same as a landing page. They are often used interchangeably, but they are actually two different types of web pages that have two very different purposes. A squeeze page has the primary purpose of collecting information and nothing else. You are trying to obtain information from a site visitor in order to market goods or services to them in some way in the future. Landing pages, on the other hand, are a direct sales page. These are generally used as a direct link when marketing or advertising campaigns are active.

When Are Squeeze Pages the Best?

Squeeze pages are the perfect solution for those who need to get visitors interested in a new brand, idea, or marketing effort. They are simple page because all that needs to be done is to convince a visitor to fill in their name and email address. When you see an opt in form pop up on a website, what you are seeing is a form of a squeeze page.

A squeeze page by itself isn’t a very effective marketing tool. This is because the average visitor will not see any value in offering their personal information to some random website. You need to be able to provide something of value that can be exchanged for this personal information. White papers, e-books, newsletters, and other free downloadable products all can provide this value. It’s good for the average marketer because creating these items is cost-effective. It’s good for the visitor because they get information that can solve a problem for them and not spend any cash to get it.

When Are Landing Pages the Best?

Landing pages are used direct a prospect towards a sale. The whole reason why a prospect is on this page in the first place is because they want to buy something that they have seen. This means you don’t have to worry a lot about design elements on this page. You simply have to direct the visitor through your sales funnel so that they will generate revenues for you.

When can you use a landing page? Anytime you have created an advertisement offer, directing a visitor to the landing page when they click on that offer is what will give you a more effective web presence. There are just three primary goals associated with a good landing page.

  • To buy something.
  • To sign up for something.
  • To share something.

That’s right – landing pages can be used to sell virtually anything.

The only problem is that the average attention span of a person who hits a landing page is 30 seconds. There are lots of longform sales letters that are used to create added “value” to the landing page, but this is content that is basically wasted. In 30 seconds, the average person can read two standard paragraphs. If you do not close your sale in those 8 sentences, then your landing page is ineffective.

Landing pages do sometimes share the characteristics of a squeeze page. The main difference is this: a squeeze page goes onto your site and solicits from organic traffic. Landing pages are used to bring in traffic from advertising and marketing campaigns that don’t originate from your own website.

What Kind of Page Can You Put on Your Website?

Most websites are going to have some sort of squeeze page on them if they are trying to sell something. These generally pop up after a visitor has been on the site for a predetermined amount of time, usually 60 to 90 seconds. A squeeze page can be placed on any page a site has to offer, especially if there are sidebars that are effectively incorporated into the user experience.

Not every website is going to benefit from a landing page. If you don’t have anything to sell, then you don’t need a landing page. If you are just giving items away for free in order to increase your brand exposure, a squeeze page will do that more effectively. In return for the free downloads, you will be able to get personal information from others that will allow you to build an effective marketing list for future goods and services you might want to offer.

Neither Should Be Compared to a Home Page

A good home page contains characteristics of both page and a landing page. The difference is that the information on a home page should be Evergreen – always valuable. Some might call this Pillar Content. You generally don’t need to make any changes to your home page because it should be filled with effective content. On the other hand, you should always be looking to make changes to a landing page or squeeze page based on the feedback that you are receiving from those who hit them.

Whatever your needs might be, there must be highly relevant content associated with your landing and squeeze pages. If you have a website about coffee and your landing page directs people to purchase video games, then your content is not being effective. It will confuse people and that will make them wish to never purchase something from you in the future. People thinking about signing up for a coffee newsletter don’t want updates about the Halo video game series either.

Is one of these pages better than the other? The answer is no. Squeeze pages and landing pages each serve unique needs. They are complementary pages instead of competing pages. A good website is going to have both types of pages available to visitors so that conversion rates can be as high as possible.

Your home page is never a landing page.

By keeping these differences in mind, you will be able to have an an effective marketing experience the next time you initiate a campaign. Use landing pages for sales, squeeze pages for information, and your home page for a high quality user experience. If you can do that, then you’ll be able to effectively market and sell whatever idea comes your way.

Landing Pages Statistics and Trends

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